Haircut

During the COVID pandemic it’s common to see men and women walking around needing haircuts. Well, trees need haircuts too. To the rescue in the days before Christmas came a City crew headed by Jacob Several, Marina Gardening Supervisor. With judicious use of the chain saw, the evergreens that line the north side of Spinnaker Way lost some of their wildness and weirdness and got back to looking like trees in a park. Cropping the trees is also important to reduce the risk of a storm breaking off branches or blowing them over. The cutoff greenery lay in the street for several days, a rich lode for enterprising park visitors looking for material to make evergreen wreaths and garlands.

Similar Posts:

One thought on “Haircut

  • December 27, 2020 at 6:32 pm
    Permalink

    Marty writes, “… the evergreens that line the north side of Spinnaker Way lost some of their wildness and weirdness and got back to looking like trees in a park. Cropping the trees is also important to reduce the risk of a storm breaking off branches or blowing them over.”

    What’s the real reason why those trees were butchered, I wonder? (E.g., in the North Basin Strip, tree-limbing was done so that the Park police could “patrol” at a distance, while also making the areas under the tree canopies less of a hidden sanctuary for illegal camping.)

    There’s nothing inherently virtuous about “losing some of their wildness and weirdness”.

    There’s nothing special abut “looking like trees in a park” –Why, with all of the other “park-like” features in CCP (sidewalks, lawns, porta-potties, kites, dogs, etc., etc., must these trees also manifest Man’s vanity to the n-th degree?

    The “risk of breaking off in a storm” was “reduced” to zero –those sawn-off and removed branches can no longer break, nor can the grow, nor give wild and weird shape to their trees.

    And so what if the trees (a tree, some trees) “blow over”? There should be occasional replacement trees being planted every decade or so, in anticipation that some older trees will die of disease, by being blown over, by being removed by management because they’ve become a dangerous hazard to the public (e.g., falling limbs; in this instance that’s an unlikely reason because all the trees’s lower limbs were removed –they couldn’t all have been in a dangerous public hazard state).

    Perhaps cleaning the bathroom facility would be a more appropriate / necessary task to which to allocate limited resources?
    And/Or allocating scarce resources to managing the Nature Area for the wildlife, and significantly reducing the off-leash dog problem?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Translate »